Dr. Wai Haung Yu

Dr. Yu is an Assistant Professor at the Taub Institute of Columbia University and serves on the scientific review boards for the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation and the Veteran’s Administration.

Wai Haung Yu, a Canadian-born scientist, received his PhD from the University of Toronto (Pharmacology) in 2001. While at the University of Toronto, he was a recipient of several fellowships including the Alzheimer’s Society of Canada Doctoral fellowship, University of Toronto Open Scholarship for Graduate Studies and the inaugural Theodore I. Sherman Graduate Award in Neuroscience. Following his PhD, he went to New York University (NYU) / Nathan Kline Institute where he did his post-doctoral work with Dr. Ralph (Randy) A. Nixon. During this time, he held a Canadian Institutes of Health post-doctoral fellowship and produced work on the role of autophagy in Alzheimer’s disease that is now considered seminal in the field. On average, these articles have 130 citations per paper (and an average of 95 citations for all co-authored articles) indicating the acknowledgement of this work.

Dr. Yu was promoted to Clinical Instructor and then Assistant Professor at NYU prior to his move to Columbia University where he continues his work on autophagy in Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, with an emphasis on the translational outcome of modulating autophagic and lysosomal degradation in neurons. Dr. Yu also serves as President of the Greater NYC Chapter for the Society for Neuroscience, whose Outreach volunteers were awarded the Next Generation Prize in 2011The Outreach program promotes neuroscience education to the general public and education (K-12).
Dr. Yu serves on several review committees including the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation and the Veteran’s Administration, as well as serving as Associate Editor of the journal, Frontiers in Psychiatry.

2014 Wai Haung Yu Advisor Fellow: Dr. Lauren Friedman, Investigation of therapeutics that reduce tau accumulation through stimulation of autophagy in cell and rodent models.